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Married Filing Separately Filing Status

If you are married but do not want to file your tax return jointly with your spouse, you can choose to file your tax return using the married filing separately tax filing status.

How to file married filing separately?

Married Filing Separately

There are many reasons why a taxpayer may want to file married filing separately. To use the married filing separately tax filing status or MFS any of the following may be true.



  • you want to be responsible for only your own tax and tax return
  • you and your spouse do not agree to file a joint tax return
What income to report on a married filing separately tax return?

When filing married filing separately, you usually report only your own income, tax exemptions, tax credits and tax deductions.

Do I have to pay more tax filing as married filing separately?

Generally, yes. Filing as a married filing separately usually results in more tax liability than filing as married filing jointly. If in doubt, you should figure out how much you will owe the IRS or how much tax refund you will get by filing as a married filing jointly and compare that to filing as a married filing separately.

Do I need to put my spouse's personal information on my tax form if I am married filing separately?

Yes. When using the married filing separately tax filing status, you have to write your spouse's full name on our 1040 tax return form as well as your spouse's social security number in the heading section just as you would when filing jointly with your spouse.

I live apart from my spouse, do I need to file married filing separately?

If a taxpayer lives apart from his or her spouse and he or she meets certain tests, the taxpayer may be considered unmarried and may be able to file his or her tax return as a head of household.

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